Kevin J. Vedrine

Partner - DuPage County Office
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Kevin J. Vedrine – Recent Cases & News

May 2013

Kevin Vedrine and Christopher Solfa successfully defended a hospital and a physician in a medical negligence lawsuit in Grundy County. Plaintiff alleged that the hospital and the physician were negligent in the care and treatment of the plaintiff, in that they allegedly failed to diagnose and treat a pulmonary embolism. The defendants maintained that the plaintiff’s condition was appropriately worked up, treated, diagnosed and cared for. Plaintiff requested that the jury award $5.25 million. The jury returned a not guilty verdict in 34 minutes.

February 2012

Kevin Vedrine and Christopher Solfa successfully defended two cardiologists in connection with a medical malpractice lawsuit filed in Kane County, Illinois. The plaintiff maintained that the decedent, a Jehovah’s Witness, suffered an “unequivocal spasm,” rather than an acute myocardial infarction. It was the theory of the plaintiff that the decedent most probably had coronary spasm triggered by a focal atherosclerotic lesion that had plaque rupture. To that end, it was the theory of the plaintiff that the procedures performed by the defendant cardiologists were not indicated and ultimately caused the death of the decedent. The defendants maintained that all of their care and treatment fell within the applicable standard of care, that coronary dissection was a very likely cause for the decedent’s presentation, and that it was within the standard of care to perform a balloon angioplasty with stent deployment. In closing argument, plaintiff’s counsel requested the jury award $5 million. The jury deliberated for less than one hour before returning a not guilty verdict.

September 2011

Kevin Vedrine and Christopher Solfa successfully defended a physician in a medical negligence lawsuit in Grundy County, Illinois. Plaintiffs contended that the defendant anesthesiologist negligently treated the decedent, resulting in Fentanyl intoxication and death. The defense maintained that all of the care and treatment provided by the defendant anesthesiologist fell within the applicable standard of care, that the decedent’s clinical course was not in any way consistent with Fentanyl intoxication, and that the use of a heating source in this particular case (a forced air warming blanket) was not a proximate cause of the decedent’s death. Rather, it was the defendant’s position that the cause of death of the decedent was as a result of her underlying respiratory condition as opposed to any effect of increased Fentanyl uptake from the use of a forced air heating device. It was the position of the defense that the most likely source of the decedent’s death was severe advanced chronic obstructive pulmonary disease. Plaintiff’s counsel asked the jury to award $2.4 million. The jury deliberated for approximately four hours before returning a not guilty verdict.

September, 2009

Kevin Vedrine and Kathleen Vece successfully defended an otolaryngologist in a medical malpractice case in Grundy County, Illinois. The defendant otolaryngologist physician excised a cyst, called a mucocele, from the plaintiff’s lower left lip after the plaintiff complained about the cyst getting in the way when he would eat. Afterwards, the plaintiff made complaints that the lower left side of his lip, where the cyst was removed, sagged and liquids would escape from the corner of his mouth when he drank. The defendant recommended another surgery to repair the problem, but the plaintiff decided to see a different otolaryngologist and have a different procedure. After the second surgery the plaintiff still claimed to have a sag in his lower left lip, problems with drooling, numbness and pain.

The plaintiff contended that the defendant took out too much tissue from the plaintiff’s lip during the first surgery. The defense refuted that too much tissue was taken out and contended that the deficits the plaintiff complained of were a natural and probable consequence of having a large mucocele removed.

The trial lasted four days and resulted in a not guilty verdict. No offer was made on behalf of the defendant. At trial the plaintiff’s counsel requested $357,000.

March, 2009

Kevin Vedrine and Christopher Solfa successfully defended an emergency medicine physician in a medical negligence lawsuit in Grundy County, Illinois. The Defendant emergency medicine physician provided care to the plaintiff’s decedent for complaints of difficulty in breathing and pain upon inhalation. Plaintiff alleged that, due to the complaints of the decedent, the emergency medicine physician was negligent for failing to order a BMP, a CBC, for failing to perform an EKG and failing to follow a hospital policy as it relates to chest pain protocol. The plaintiff’s decedent passed away as a result of a myocardial infarction eight days later.

The defense contended that at the time the plaintiff’s decedent was seen by the Defendant physician, his symptoms were not cardiac in origin and, instead, were pleuritic in nature. The pathologist who performed the autopsy testified that the myocardial infarction, that caused the plaintiff’s decedent’s death, occurred 24 to 72 hours prior to the decedent’s passing.

The trial, which lasted six court days, resulted in a not guilty verdict. No offer was made on behalf of the emergency medicine physician. Plaintiff’s counsel requested an award of $1.2 million.